Juliano Morimoto

Academic Fellow, University of Aberdeen
  • University of Aberdeen
  • +447985420573
  • United Kingdom

About Juliano Morimoto

Dr Morimoto is an entomologist interested in developmental ecology of insect larvae. He is an advocate for true equality of opportunity to all in STEM, aiming to make academic institutions and academia, fair.

Intro Content

Contributor

Has Natural History been under lockdown?

Lifting restrictions on Natural History studies can help us discover more about what we don’t know – and what we think we know but don’t.

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Recent Comments

Nov 17, 2020
Replying to Fabio Berzaghi

Yes this is sad news, there are less and less people who are qualified to be museum curators, so I wonder if the long-term plan of museums is to get rid of curators. PhD on Natural History are almost non-existent because of the funding issue you mentioned.

Fabio, thank you very much for your comment – and it is such a good one! You are spot on that there seems to be a trend for curators to be disappearing. In fact, here at the University of Aberdeen, the 'word in the street' is that the Natural History Museum does not have an official curator (a sad true that has been going on for a while). It is more remarkable because here we have the Regius Chair in Natural History! Well, hopefully we can change the way the fields are evolving, and we can keep Natural History alive for the next generation of scientists...

Sep 19, 2019
Replying to Ruth Milne

I love this - the three Heads of Peer Review, brilliant! Which head came first - author?

Thank you Ruth! 
Definitely author comes first – that's how we get to be known and invited to be Reviewers (Head 2) and Editors (Head 3) =) 

Why don't we hear from your experience as part of this community? 

May 15, 2019
Replying to Filipe Dezordi

Hi Juliano, I make a translation to Portugues, available in:

https://medium.com/@zimmer_f/brasil-rumo-a-um-pa%C3%ADs-sem-educa%C3%A7%C3%A3o-2aa89316de50


There is any problem?


Thanks for your text !

Hi Felipe Dezordi,

No problem at all. I had a look and all credits seem to be given appropriately. Thank you very much for the translation and let's keep spreading the word around our country and the world.

Thanks again!
Juliano

May 14, 2019
Replying to Rodrigo Xavier

Quite true, but the country is broke, It doesnt have money to do anything. We have more than 13 Million people uneployeed, people that have a Master and speak english as myself. My nice os taking a Master in Engineering because she didnt find any job when she took her bachelor degree 2 Years Ago - and still looking for something, but the economy is getting smaller year after year. So basically It doesnt worth taking a Master or a PHd in Brazil, because ALL you can do os framed your title and put at your wall. 

The Best thing you can do in Brazil is study abroad to get out from this giant trap that becomes this Republic of Bananas. No justice, senate and deputies looking at your own interests, corruption at everywhere, problems of solvency to pay debts and the concern is about the master degrees ... Sorry but you know nothing from Brazil. 

And Just to conclude my allegations, this is not the First time that happen something like this in Brazil, this contingency had happened other 3 times along the last 16 Years ( no one says anything about that , but Ok) , the First time, my sister in law, that was taking a PHd in microbiology, loose her government aid - but she was so good, and never gave up, then she send her studies to Michigan University ... Of course that she moved to US, and she never, ever , think for a Second to return to Brazil. 

As I Said, the problem here os not the money to study ... Is the country !!!

Agreed 100%! Thank you very much Alessandra Schneider. I am glad we can join forces in this battle.

May 14, 2019
Replying to Rodrigo Xavier

Quite true, but the country is broke, It doesnt have money to do anything. We have more than 13 Million people uneployeed, people that have a Master and speak english as myself. My nice os taking a Master in Engineering because she didnt find any job when she took her bachelor degree 2 Years Ago - and still looking for something, but the economy is getting smaller year after year. So basically It doesnt worth taking a Master or a PHd in Brazil, because ALL you can do os framed your title and put at your wall. 

The Best thing you can do in Brazil is study abroad to get out from this giant trap that becomes this Republic of Bananas. No justice, senate and deputies looking at your own interests, corruption at everywhere, problems of solvency to pay debts and the concern is about the master degrees ... Sorry but you know nothing from Brazil. 

And Just to conclude my allegations, this is not the First time that happen something like this in Brazil, this contingency had happened other 3 times along the last 16 Years ( no one says anything about that , but Ok) , the First time, my sister in law, that was taking a PHd in microbiology, loose her government aid - but she was so good, and never gave up, then she send her studies to Michigan University ... Of course that she moved to US, and she never, ever , think for a Second to return to Brazil. 

As I Said, the problem here os not the money to study ... Is the country !!!

Hi Rodrigo,


First, thank you very much for the comment. It is really important that people speak up here so we can listen to different opinions.

Second, you mentioned that I don't know anything about Brazil. I myself am Brazilian, and have my degree from Brazil (Universidade Federal do Paraná) (see  https://www.ufpr.br/portalufpr/noticias/brasileiro-mais-jovem-a-conquistar-doutorado-egresso-da-ufpr-e-eleito-membro-de-instituicoes-internacionais-de-biologia/). So I do know about Brazil – maybe not as much as you but I do have some understanding of the country and the educational system.

Third, I totally agree that there are bigger issues that affect the country, and that education itself is only the tip of the iceberg. As you mentioned, corruption, unemployment, inflation etc are all a huge factor in our country. However, I disagree when you blame the country itself for its problems.  You said that "the problem is not the money to study" and I truly disagree with this statement. 

In Brazil, the massive social differences preclude low-income people to have the opportunity to study. As a result, we lose talent, innovation, and discoveries. On top of that, public institutions are often neglected by the government (and to some extent, by their own administration), which leads to the wrecking ('sucateamento') of these institutions and lower-than-optimal science outputs. 

Public institutions are the most valuable places for science in Brazil (both in quantity and quality of outputs). Moreover, public institutions are democratic, and allow students from ALL social classes to obtain good education.By decreasing the budget of public institutions, the government is clearly stating that they don't care about equal opportunities of education, and they don't care about the science/technology output of our country.

In short, while I agree with you that there are more problems in Brazil, the government's policy against public universities is really a massive issue to the future of our country – and needs to be stopped.

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